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The Future of the Internet

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2007 was undoubtedly the year of Social Networking, but what of 2008? Will '08 be the year of "Unified Communications" or the year when CMS comes to stand for "Community Management System" - or even "Collaboration Management System"? Or will it be the year of a giga-merger, to beat the mere mega-mergers of 2007? As usual at the end of each year, SYS-CON has been informally polling its globe-girdling network of software developers, industry executives, commentators, investors, writers, and editors. As always, the range and depth of their answers is fascinating, throwing light not just on where the industry is going but also how it's going to get there, why, because of who, within what kind of time-scale. Enjoy! RIAs versus AJAX . Ruby on Rails . PHP . Facebook Competitors  TIM BRAY Director of Web Technologies, Sun Tim Bray managed the Oxford English Dictionary projec... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: Are We Blogging Each Other To Death?

Jeremy Geelan's i-Technology Blog: Are We Blogging Each Other To Death? "For a journalist, technologist, politician or anyone with a pulse and who doesn't know everything," wrote Dan Farber on Monday, "blogs matter." Then, in almost a textbook demonstration of why in fact they don't, Farber adds: "Every morning I can wake up to lots of IQ ruminating, fulminating, arguing, evangelizing and even disapassionately reporting on the latest happenings in the areas that interest me, people from every corner of the globe." That "even" says it all. Dispassionate reporting would certainly be the exception rather than the rule. So in what possible way, then, is this testimony to why and how blogs "matter"? Farber is mistaking energy for insight, prevalance for significance, and quantity for quality. He might almost have written that every morning he wakes up with a column to fill.... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: "Personal Blogs Will Be Dead in Another Two or Three Years"

Web 2.0 has been a buzzword shrouded in mystery. Although I've heard it used hundreds of times in the past year, I've never been able to find a good definition of what it actually means. This is in part because, as Paul Graham points out, Dougherty coined the term before defining it. When brainstorming on Web 2.0, O'Reilly laid out a list of services that seemed qualitatively different than those that had come before and looked for patterns. What he eventually came up with was a list of seven principles and eight patterns. O'Reilly hits the nail on the head here with his inductive approach. However, I still come away from O'Reilly's manifesto wishing for definitive clarity. So here I set out to put forth a working definition of what Web 2.0 really is, how it differs from Web 1.0, and how it will differ from what may come after. I am not proposing that these are abso... (more)

Exclusive Q&A with Mike Milinkovich, Eclipse Foundation

"We continue to struggle a bit with what developers think “Eclipse” means. They have heard of it, but they believe that we are entirely focused on Java tools when in fact we are doing so much more," says Mike Milinkovich, Executive Director of the Eclipse Foundation, in this exclusive Q&A with Jeremy Geelan. "Our goals at Eclipse are to create an industrial-strength open source development platform that spans extensible tools, frameworks and runtimes," adds Milinkovich - pictured here during a previous Webcast on SYS-CON.TV from our Times Square studio. Eclipse Developer's Journal: May 20th marked your 4th anniversary as the Executive Director of the Eclipse Foundation. What have been the biggest changes in the Eclipse ecosystem in that time? Mike Milinkovich: I believe the biggest change is the breadth of the projects that are happening at Eclipse today, and the eco... (more)

Publishing Synergy: Blog, Twitter and Ulitzer

Government Cloud on Ulitzer Have you ever been given the task of building and executing an aggressive customer outreach program? Well I received my assignment about a year ago and trust me; the budget was not commensurate with the assigned goal. My particular need was to educate prospective Federal government customers on a new information technology trend. Known as cloud computing, this new approach blends service oriented architecture (SOA), virtualization technologies and a "pay-by-the-use" sales approach into a new IT delivery business model. Although this new approach promised the delivery of better constituent service at a reduced cost, risk adverse Federal agency decision makers needed to know much more before they would even consider cloud computing as an option. During a time of economic collapse and fiscal crisis, competing security, governance and procur... (more)

i-Technology Blog: Is There Life Beyond Google?

In one of my (several) former professional lives, I used to publish books about the future, including for example the world’s first full-length book about groupware. That was back in 1994 and the book was called Groupware on the 21st Century. If I’d been a clairvoyant I guess I would have called it simply The Future Is Google, but the Web hadn’t yet taken off, let alone Google, Inc. – mainly because Sergey Brin and Larry Page were both still only 21 years old. Fast-forward 12 years and how very much the landscape has changed. It turns out the world was neither flat, not round, but Google-shaped. Because much of what is said and done on the Web is currently said or done via Google. But what comes after Google? Where will the Web, the Internet, the whole nexus of telecommunications, i-Technology, and the quest for a better world, take us? My strong sense is as follows... (more)

Web 2.0 - Web 3.0 - The "Social Web"

Jeremiah Owyang, of the popular Web Strategy by Jeremiah blog (and now an analyst at Forrester), wrote a post several months ago entitled The Irrelevant Corporate Website. And in typical Owyang style, it is thought-provoking and has been translated into several languages, including Greek, Swedish, and German. As one of the owners of a digital marketing and communications company, I'd like to extend Owyang’s argument that the corporate Website is irrelevant, and present a framework that just might make it more relevant than ever. Let's consider the pages of a traditional corporate Website. They include an “about me” page, a contact page, a careers section, and probably a page with news and press releases. The words look good on paper, and, more than likely, a committee gave the final sign-off on the site's content. Visitors frequented these pages... (more)

Virtualization Conference & Expo 2009 West: Call for Papers Closing

Now held three times a year, in New York, Prague, and Silicon Valley, the organizing principle of each International Virtualization Conference & Expo remains the same: our aim is to ensure, through an intense and carefully chosen program of technical and strategic breakout sessions, that attending delegates leave each Conference with abundant resources, ideas and examples they can apply immediately to leveraging Virtualization, helping them to maximize performance, minimize cost and improve the efficiency and flexibility of their Enterprise IT endeavors. The Call for Papers for the 7th International Virtualization Conference & Expo, which will be held in Santa Clara, CA, on November 2- 4, 2009, is currently still open. The submissions URL is here, and the deadline for submissions is June 30, 2009. Topics welcomed include every aspect of virtualization. For example: ... (more)

Is Web 2.0 Entering "The Trough of Disillusionment"?

Surely they jest. Jeffrey Zeldman has an interesting and widely covered new article on Web 2.0 which is almost exactly as content free as he claims the Web 2.0 hypesters are. That's not to say that he doesn't make a few factually correct statements about AJAX and even makes a passing mention of social software. But he's missing many of the big pieces of Web 2.0 since he's apparently looking at it through the somewhat myopic tunnel vision of a web page designer.  Yes, Jeffrey understands the Web from the front-end, but apparently not the whole thing, and so misses some important parts. In the end, Jeffrey doesn't like Web 2.0 because 1) he apparently didn't bother to really understand it and 2) he really dislikes any annoying people that have picked up on the name. Yes folks, for a lot of non-technical people, Web 2.0 seems oh-so-approachable and some are beating us ... (more)

Ulitzer vs. Ning - a Quick Review

Having used both sites for about two weeks, there is still a great deal I am learning to do with both Ulitzer and Ning, but a reader asked if I would do a quick comparison, so I will. The obvious point for me is that the sites have two different objectives for the writers.  For Ning, the writer is trying to be involved in a niche social network from scratch.  For example, I have built my own social network for marketers and salespeople called BuyerSteps.  I created BuyerSteps as a way for other professionals to join in a conversation around the 21st century buyer.  So, Ning represents a way to build a community. In the case of Ulitzer, as a writer I am focused on getting readers from within an existing audience.  There are already thousands of readers coming to the Ulitzer site, so if they are interested in my topics such as marketing, they will find my articles as ... (more)

i-Technology Blog: Welcome to the New "Golden World" of Web 2.0 and Beyond

We tend to forget that 'There's nothing new, except that there's nothing new.' Most especially we tend to forget that human beings have been processing new experiences in terms of old ones for millennia. Permit me to give you an example... Many commentators, analysts, executives, and software developers so far this year - as I write we are past midsummer's day, so the period I am thinking of is now just over half a year long - have been processing the arrival of what has been dubbed "Web 2.0" with sage prudence born of having seen Web 2.0's bubble-like characteristics once before, with Web 1.0...and having gotten burned. That the VC community is showing no such prudence, to these people, is evidence enough of recidivism. Old ways die hard, especially old ways that at one point enriched an entire galaxy of talented individuals, go-for-it angels, risk-savvy institutio... (more)